Staples Associate Connection – Important Information You Need to Know

If you are a Staples employee, you are able to access your employee information from anywhere you have an Internet connection.  Staples Associate Connection – Important Information. You can simply visit the Staples Associate Connection and log in. Staples Associate Connection – Important Information You Need to Know. The most important question is “What Is Staples Associate Connection?”

The Staples Associate Connection is the employee human resources portal for all Staples stores. You will be able to view all of your personal information through the use of this portal. You will be able to see your job description, how much you get paid, how much vacation time you have and your sick leave too. You can also view your pay stubs and print them out in case you need to use them for employment verification.

Methods of logging into the portal.

In order to log into the portal, you will need your username and password. Your username is your employee id number. This numbers has been randomly assigned to you and is in alomst all cases 7 digits.

If you’ve left Staple and have been rehired, you will have the same 7 digit number. However, you may not have access until you are approved by the human resources department.

There are number of ways to find out what your employee id is. You can contact your human resource manager for your store. You can also look on your pay stub. If you still have your personal enrollment worksheet from when you oriented with the store. You will find your employee id in the upper right corner. The id is also found at Staples@Work People Search.

Are you a CE Associate? You will have to retrieve your employee id from the open enrollment material you’ll receive. This information should be mailed to you around the middle of May.

Once you have your username or employee id, all you need if your password to enter the portal. When you first start working for Staples, you will receive a default password. This is usually your year of birth and then the last four number of your social security number.

Once you log into the portal with your employee id and default password, you will have to change your password to ensure confidentiality. Choose a password that is easily remembered by you. Never share your information with anyone as they will be able to log into the portal and have access to all of your personal information regarding your work with Staples.

Be aware that passwords are case sensitive. Using capital letters in your password means you will have to enter capital letters each time you log in. It is wise to use both capital letters and numbers in your password to increase the security of it.

What if You Forget Your Password?

If you’ve forgotten your password, you can easily retrieve it by click on the forgotten password link. You will have to enter in your employee id and a way for your new password to be sent to you. Once you receive your new password, you will be instructed to log in and change it. Make sure to write down your password in a secure place to keep from having to retrieve your password from the system the next time you forget.

Handling Errors Found in the Portal

If you find an error in your personal information, you may correct it in the portal. You do not have to contact anyone about this change as it will show throughout the entire Staples corporation system.

If you find an error in your pay, you will have to contact the human resources department as well as your manager. You may have to verify the hours you worked to receive an adjustment.

Human Resource Ease with Associate Connection

This downloadable PDF is considered vital information for all Americans. Get it here:

http://www.wakeupkiwi.com/downloadpapers/20151222_Neil_Keenan_History_and_Events_Timeline.pdf

The Staples Associate Connection provides employees an easy way to handle most their human resources needs. When looking for employment with a company that cares about their employees, Staples is it.

HealthCare Trends in HR

It’s no secret in the healthcare industry that the labor force is possibly the most expense cost center. But with the lack of professionals and a disconcerting future, the fears surrounding the healthcare labor force are extending beyond cost.

Clinton Wingrove, EVP and principal consultant at Pilat HR Solutions, thinks, though, lessons can be learned from the various issues industry leaders are facing. Whether its recruiting or training, or dealing with the incoming millennial workers, he outlines eight trends concerning the changing healthcare workforce.

1. The retirement of the baby boomer generation and the lack of new talent. And this trend isn’t specific to healthcare, Wingrove said. “Many industries are facing some huge challenges, not least of which is seeing a serious increase in the number of older people – the baby boomers – backing out of the workforce.” He added issues arise when organizations, in particular those in the healthcare realm, have skilled senior people as opposed to “generalists.” “They’re looking to retain that experience,” he said. “So there’s a bit of tension there. You have people who are skilled managerial staff and are generalists who you can replace more easily, and then you have senior people.” Retaining experience is critical, said Wingrove, and in some fields, like healthcare, “we’re not seeing sufficient talent come through.”

2. The shortage of skilled health IT professionals. There’s no surprise a major trend in today’s workforce is the lack of IT professionals. “It seems as though we’re suffering a shortage of the very skilled talent and the highly skilled programmers, clinicians and technicians,” said Wingrove. “As we see healthcare continue, it’s not literally exponential, but as we see the sophistication of healthcare grow much faster than the economy, the need for highly skilled talent is going to increase and outplace the availability.”

[See also: Jobs abound.]

3. An impending trend of significant turnover. At the moment, said Wingrove, the industry is seeing “almost a perfect storm.” “Because of the recession, we have a lot of people nervous and consequently staying in their jobs. But we’re not seeing an increase in salaries, and so, there’s growing evidence there is a latent dissatisfaction and people are questioning whether loyalty makes sense anymore.” Add to that evidence of a growing belief that when the economy picks up, we’re bound to see major turnover, continued Wingrove. “They think the grass is greener on the other side, and that concerns me because in healthcare in particular, skilled workforce and proven experience is highly valuable for efficiency reasons. I do feel this year or next we’ll see some serious churn of staff combined with a lack of high caliber new talent coming through.”

4. The undertrained millennial generation. In addition to the lack of new talent entering the healthcare workforce, Wingrove said serious underlying issues exist when it comes to the country’s educational system. “I’m convinced we’re not doing enough to drive up the caliber of the people who are exiting the educational system and [are coming] into the workforce,” he said. There are two areas he believes we’re falling short: the actual skill level of recent graduates, and failing to encourage college students to pursue the more technical fields. “Now, I think it’s better than it was,” Wingrove said. “But I don’t believe we’re driving it fast enough – demand is going to continue, for the foreseeable future, to outstrip supply.”

5. The changing future of healthcare leadership. Amidst the negative effects of the changing workforce on healthcare, said Wingrove, there is one positive change he believes will be seen. “Healthcare is one of the industries where it’s tended to have a relatively bureaucratic and traditional style of management,” he said. “Frankly, healthcare isn’t known for the quality of its management; healthcare is largely populated by experts in their fields, and that means they’re not great at general management and leadership.” But what’s going to happen, predicts Wingrove, concerns the younger generation stepping in to fill gaps. According to him, millennials are more demanding, more social and more connected. “They don’t recognize hierarchies and structures,” he said. “So I think it’s going to open up a lot more debate about more cross-functional work and creating more mobile workforces…the locus of power is going to change. If you go into a hospital now, the locus of power is with the clinicians and the senior leadership team. If you go into more contemporary organizations, like Google, the locus of power is with the employees.”

6. The rise of more open communication and collaboration. Younger employees, particularly those using social media, have a more open concept of communication, said Wingrove. “People, typically in their early 20s, don’t even recognize email as technology; everything is done through texting,” he said. “So, I think we’re going to see an opening up of communication and a much more fluid flow of information.” This will also include more innovation in areas that have been traditionally stagnant, he continued, like management, leadership and structure. In fact, a better sense of openness is going to address a significant issue of finding those who can fill leadership roles. “And IT isn’t exempt from that,” he said. “We’ve bred technically capable people, but we haven’t bred healthcare people, and we certainly haven’t bred business people. I think the younger generation is more willing to broaden their knowledge of expertise and skill…if they don’t have the information given to them, they’ll go find it.”

7. The impact of company culture on recruitment and retainment. Although recruitment is clearly an issue, said Wingrove, the problem runs deeper. In fact, organizations can’t expect to solve their recruitment conundrums without having a culture and environment where people can excel and want to stay. “Recruiting people is only feeding one end of the pipeline that’s open at the other. An organization has to manage their entire pipeline of talent, where, if you’re going to bring the right people on board, you have to assimilate them into the organization and excite them enough to stay.” He said it’s crucial to develop a synergy between an organization’s engagement and retention strategies and its recruitment strategies, since, “you want to recruit people who are going to be relatively self motivated and independent: people who are going to view themselves as part of the business and not just as technical specialists, and then develop a leadership and management style that’s going to allow those people to feel respected – that’s adding value to the organization as a whole.”

8. The younger generation’s desire to have a broader say in the business. “I do believe the younger generation coming in wants to have a broader say in the business,” said Wingrove. “If you bring someone in as a programmer, you shouldn’t assume they just want to be a programmer – they want to take an interest in why what they’re doing matters.” The newer generation doesn’t view their positions purely as jobs, continued Wingrove. Instead, they want to feel they’re part of the business, and therefore need to be encouraged to view themselves as part of a bigger team. “They’re not merely a programmer, an analyst or a clinician,” he said. “They’re part of a healthcare system, and that’s one of the things that’s going to differentiate between the organizations that are successful at attracting and keeping people versus those with a constant churn of people.”

Clinton Wingrove, EVP and principal consultant at Pilat HR Solutions, thinks, though, lessons can be learned from the various issues industry leaders are facing. Whether its recruiting or training, or dealing with the incoming millennial workers, he outlines eight trends concerning the changing healthcare workforce.

1. The retirement of the baby boomer generation and the lack of new talent. And this trend isn’t specific to healthcare, Wingrove said. “Many industries are facing some huge challenges, not least of which is seeing a serious increase in the number of older people – the baby boomers – backing out of the workforce.” He added issues arise when organizations, in particular those in the healthcare realm, have skilled senior people as opposed to “generalists.” “They’re looking to retain that experience,” he said. “So there’s a bit of tension there. You have people who are skilled managerial staff and are generalists who you can replace more easily, and then you have senior people.” Retaining experience is critical, said Wingrove, and in some fields, like healthcare, “we’re not seeing sufficient talent come through.”

2. The shortage of skilled health IT professionals. There’s no surprise a major trend in today’s workforce is the lack of IT professionals. “It seems as though we’re suffering a shortage of the very skilled talent and the highly skilled programmers, clinicians and technicians,” said Wingrove. “As we see healthcare continue, it’s not literally exponential, but as we see the sophistication of healthcare grow much faster than the economy, the need for highly skilled talent is going to increase and outpace the availability.”

3. An impending trend of significant turnover. At the moment, said Wingrove, the industry is seeing “almost a perfect storm.” “Because of the recession, we have a lot of people nervous and consequently staying in their jobs. But we’re not seeing an increase in salaries, and so, there’s growing evidence there is a latent dissatisfaction and people are questioning whether loyalty makes sense anymore.” Add to that evidence of a growing belief that when the economy picks up, we’re bound to see major turnover, continued Wingrove. “They think the grass is greener on the other side, and that concerns me because in healthcare in particular, skilled workforce and proven experience is highly valuable for efficiency reasons. I do feel this year or next we’ll see some serious churn of staff combined with a lack of high caliber new talent coming through.”

4. The undertrained millennial generation. In addition to the lack of new talent entering the healthcare workforce, Wingrove said serious underlying issues exist when it comes to the country’s educational system. “I’m convinced we’re not doing enough to drive up the caliber of the people who are exiting the educational system and [are coming] into the workforce,” he said. There are two areas he believes we’re falling short: the actual skill level of recent graduates, and failing to encourage college students to pursue the more technical fields. “Now, I think it’s better than it was,” Wingrove said. “But I don’t believe we’re driving it fast enough – demand is going to continue, for the foreseeable future, to outstrip supply.”

5. The changing future of healthcare leadership. Amidst the negative effects of the changing workforce on healthcare, said Wingrove, there is one positive change he believes will be seen. “Healthcare is one of the industries where it’s tended to have a relatively bureaucratic and traditional style of management,” he said. “Frankly, healthcare isn’t known for the quality of its management; healthcare is largely populated by experts in their fields, and that means they’re not great at general management and leadership.” But what’s going to happen, predicts Wingrove, concerns the younger generation stepping in to fill gaps. According to him, millennials are more demanding, more social and more connected. “They don’t recognize hierarchies and structures,” he said. “So I think it’s going to open up a lot more debate about more cross-functional work and creating more mobile workforces…the locus of power is going to change. If you go into a hospital now, the locus of power is with the clinicians and the senior leadership team. If you go into more contemporary organizations, like Google, the locus of power is with the employees.”

6. The rise of more open communication and collaboration. Younger employees, particularly those using social media, have a more open concept of communication, said Wingrove. “People, typically in their early 20s, don’t even recognize email as technology; everything is done through texting,” he said. “So, I think we’re going to see an opening up of communication and a much more fluid flow of information.” This will also include more innovation in areas that have been traditionally stagnant, he continued, like management, leadership and structure. In fact, a better sense of openness is going to address a significant issue of finding those who can fill leadership roles. “And IT isn’t exempt from that,” he said. “We’ve bred technically capable people, but we haven’t bred healthcare people, and we certainly haven’t bred business people. I think the younger generation is more willing to broaden their knowledge of expertise and skill…if they don’t have the information given to them, they’ll go find it.”

[See also: Workforce training at work.]

7. The impact of company culture on recruitment and retainment. Although recruitment is clearly an issue, said Wingrove, the problem runs deeper. In fact, organizations can’t expect to solve their recruitment conundrums without having a culture and environment where people can excel and want to stay. “Recruiting people is only feeding one end of the pipeline that’s open at the other. An organization has to manage their entire pipeline of talent, where, if you’re going to bring the right people on board, you have to assimilate them into the organization and excite them enough to stay.” He said it’s crucial to develop a synergy between an organization’s engagement and retention strategies and its recruitment strategies, since, “you want to recruit people who are going to be relatively self motivated and independent: people who are going to view themselves as part of the business and not just as technical specialists, and then develop a leadership and management style that’s going to allow those people to feel respected – that’s adding value to the organization as a whole.”

8. The younger generation’s desire to have a broader say in the business. “I do believe the younger generation coming in wants to have a broader say in the business,” said Wingrove. “If you bring someone in as a programmer, you shouldn’t assume they just want to be a programmer – they want to take an interest in why what they’re doing matters.” The newer generation doesn’t view their positions purely as jobs, continued Wingrove. Instead, they want to feel they’re part of the business, and therefore need to be encouraged to view themselves as part of a bigger team. “They’re not merely a programmer, an analyst or a clinician,” he said. “They’re part of a healthcare system, and that’s one of the things that’s going to differentiate between the organizations that are successful at attracting and keeping people versus those with a constant churn of people.”

The new health care reforms are resulting in many changes to HR trends within health care companies. A thorough understanding of new health care policies and the company’s responsibilities in accordance with these, are leading many HR departments to find more efficient ways to accurately manage policy and benefit administration. Companies are increasingly choosing to streamline payroll and benefits, using software options or outsourcing these HR tasks. Software options ensure that companies stay up to date with policy changes, and may include software packages which administrate procedures such as the Family and Medical Leave act. As non-compliance to policies such as these can have serious financial implications, these options can prove to be particularly beneficial.

HR departments are also playing important roles in the company’s strategic decision making, helping to identify and implement long term goals. As a result, HR departments are beginning to become more results or goal orientated. The importance of HR analytic software and the ability to interpret data currently held by the department is more important than ever. Analyzing data, such as high employee turnover, can help to identify areas in which the company can improve, to both attract and maintain highly skilled staff, which is integral for success. In addition to utilizing analytic software, companies may also consider training HR staff within quality control and quality assessment.

HR trends include the use of software as a service (SaaS) applications, which are developed, managed, and operated by external vendors and which run over the internet as cloud-based applications. Companies have immediate access to these for a monthly fee, greatly reducing their overheads such as their IT budget and associated staff payroll. Moreover, the SaaS software helps companies to stay on top of the competitive market, as these are often updated and innovative. Similarly, cloud computing can help to reduce costs for a company by consolidating data centers and servers and reduce capital investments by allowing companies to only pay for the services that they use. The use of cloud software also allows companies to keep up to date with the fast paced changes in the industry, and efficiently roll out new practices and policies to multiple departments and locations.

Changes to the recruitment process are also taking place as part of these HR trends, with an increased emphasis on social media and networking sites. HR departments should ensure that they are familiar with these in order to effectively compete for high quality staff within the market. One way companies are attracting employees, is their provision of up to date training and helping to develop workers skills once they are employed. The use of e-leaning and webinar podcasts, allow employees to access global and up to date training which was not previously possible. These options also help to greatly reduced costs associated with travel, time lost from work, and allows business to stay on the cutting edge of new knowledge and information.